Agreements English

Adjectives correspond to gender and number with nouns that modify them in French. As with verbs, chords are sometimes displayed only in spelling, because forms written with different formulas are sometimes pronounced in the same way (z.B. pretty, pretty); although, in many cases, the final consonant is pronounced in feminine forms, but mute in masculine forms (for example. B Small vs. Small). Most plural forms end on -s, but this consonant is pronounced only in connecting contexts, and these are determinants that help to understand whether the singular or plural is targeted. In some cases, verb participations correspond to the subject or object. Most Slavic languages are very volatile, with the exception of Bulgarian and Macedonian. The correspondence is similar to Latin, for example between adjectives and nouns in gender, number, uppercase and lowercase (if counted as a separate category).

The following examples come from the Serbokroatic: in Hungarian, verbs have a polypersonal correspondence, which means that they correspond to more than one of the arguments of the verb: not only with its subject, but also with its object (battery). There is a distinction between the case where there is a particular object and the case where the object is indeterminate or where there is no object at all. (Adverbians have no influence on the form of the verb.) Examples: Szeretek (I like someone or something unspecified), more (I love him, she, she or she, in particular), szeretlek (I love you); szeret (he loves me, us, you, someone or something indeterminate), szereti (he loves him, him or her specifically). Of course, names or pronouns can specify the exact object. In short, there is a correspondence between a verb and the person and the number of its subject and the specificity of its object (which often relates more or less precisely to the person). If you use a singular subject of the sentence, the verb you use must also be singular. These should always be consistent. Example of contemporary forms: you want, you must be, you have, you can. Example of forms of past: you would be, you should, you were, you had, you could ”Some nouns are often used with singulars, although they are plural: some nouns are usually plural in use, although they call a little singular.” In Latin, a pronoun such as ”ego” and ”do” is inserted only for contrast and selection….

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